There are signs that the slump is easing after prime London property going through a though year

The City of Westminster, Camden, and Kensington and Chelsea are capital’s three most expensive boroughs. According to a report from LSL Acadata published Monday, These three boroughs each saw sales jump by more than 20 percent in the third quarter.

This surge indicates that “momentum is returning” to prime central London after a year of tumbling property prices.

Acadata’s Peter Williams and John Tindale  said “Movement at the top end of the market helps to increase activity all the way down the housing chain,”

The report may also be a cause for optimism nationally. While November’s 0.9 percent annual gain in prices was the slowest since April 2012, and down from 6.3 percent a year ago, they increased from the previous month for the first time since March.The signs of improvement buck a trend of pessimistic reports on housing, particularly regarding London.

In the RICS survey, brokers flagged a range of reasons for the stagnation, including Brexit uncertainty, political instability and November’s interest-rate increase from the Bank of England.

Even in Acadata’s report, the picture isn’t entirely rosy. Prices in the Greater London area were down 3 percent from a year ago in October, with the City of Westminster leading losses with an 18.2 percent drop. London’s market also remains a drag on the UK.

The annual change in prices reported this month would have been 3.3 percent without the capital and the southeast.


The property market in London has been hit harder than any other region in the country by the sharp slowdown since Brexit, official figures reveal today.

The average value of a home in the capital dropped 0.2 percent in September to £483,568, making London the only place in England where prices went into reverse.

Prices in six out of the 33 local authority areas in the capital.Brent, The City, Westminster, Enfield, Kensington & Chelsea, and Lambeth fell year on year. Across London, prices rose just 2.5 percent, less half the national rate of 5.7 percent.

Just outside London, in the South-East region, prices are going up at 5.5 percent a year, suggesting that growing numbers of buyers are giving up on London and looking at locations in the Home Counties instead. Today’s figures do not include the impact of the Bank of England’s interest rate rise this month, the first for a decade. When the benchmark cost of borrowing doubled from 0.25 percent to 0.5 percent.

Jonathan Hopper, managing director of home buying agency Garrington Property Finders, said: “Winter has come early to the London property market. What began as a freezing of prices in the capital’s most exclusive postcodes is turning into a harder frost on both activity and prices.

London is now not just the worst performing English region, it’s a serial laggard. In the 12 months to September, prices in the capital rose at barely a third of the pace of those in the fastest-growing region. This shift is being driven by a steady flight of equity from London — and other previously overheated regions — to areas with greater affordability.

“It’s far too early to talk of the market seizing up, as demand remains relatively robust. But falling real wages and the ongoing problems of affordability are starting to have a noticeable chilling effect.”

North London estate agent Jeremy Leaf said: “Although, of course, there is no average UK price and the UK market reflects all different areas working at various paces, the trend in London is quite different where an excess of supply and weak demand are combining to reduce prices consistently with no real prospect of an increase until early next year at the soonest.”

At the time of the Brexit referendum in June 2016, prices in London were rising at 11.6 percent a year, but they have slowed down dramatically as uncertainty over the withdrawal process from the EU has alarmed buyers. Agents have also blamed higher stamp duty rates for slowing down demand at the top end of the market.

Today’s figures also show that the number of home sales is still plummeting. There were just 6,639 transactions in London in July, down 24 percent on last year. In Tower Hamlets, they fell by two thirds, from 463 to just 160, in an area with a population of more than 300,000.


New build vs. Second-hand homes in London: house price report reveals six-figure gap between new and resale flats

There’s a huge gulf between the average price of old and new-build flats in London. New builds can offer peace of mind while ex-councils flats are best for value so weigh up the pros and cons carefully before you buy.

Ex-council vs. new-build prices in every London borough

The six-figure price gulf between new and resale property, and between privately built and former council homes, is revealed in a new study focusing on London.

Research comparing the cost of one-bedroom flats in every borough shows pre-owned homes cost an average £542,715, while a new-build one-bedroom flat costs an average £679,671. That’s 22 percent — or almost £137,000 — more.

An ex-council one-bedroom flat is the best value of all at £396,317 on average, the Hamptons International study shows. This is more than £146,000 — or 31 percent — less than buying a privately built flat, and more than £283,000, or 52 percent, cheaper than a new-build flat.

New build is always the premium buy, for the peace of mind that comes with a modern, well-insulated home, often with such extras as communal gardens and sports facilities. In today’s tricky market some developers are offering good deals such as paying buyers’ stamp duty to stimulate sales, but the property will always come out more expensive with annual service charges on top.


New — what £350,000 buys you: a flat at Leven Wharf, Poplar, with a terrace and city views but only one bedroom. For sale with My London Home (020 8012 5708)

Not long ago you could have said a new-build flat, bought off-plan, would make you a profit by the time you moved in. The direction of the current market is anybody’s guess because of stamp duty hikes and the fallout from the Brexit vote.


Adrian Plant, director and head of new homes at estate agents Currell, says: “With the new build, you hope you know that for the first 10 years there will not be any major costs. You won’t need to pay for builders and plumbers, and many developments now come with a concierge to handle maintenance and sort out issues like arranging for parcel delivery or laundry, at a cost of service charges.”

Buyers of older homes pay less to purchase, but often then stump up for renovations and/or extensions. Of course, an older home may bring the bonus of period features such as cornicing, wide staircases, stained glass and Victorian tiled floors.



Old — what £329,999 buys you: a second-floor ex-council flat with two double bedrooms in Clapton E5. Former council homes can be great value, but ask locals what life on the estate is like before you commit to buying

Ex-local authority homes are fantastic value but this is the riskiest sector to buy into. Generally, those built before the Sixties and Seventies are higher quality and larger than a more modern home. But on estates blighted by years of underinvestment, flats can be shabby, common areas depressing and getting a mortgage can be a pain.

However, Stephen Lovelady, sales manager at Foxtons’ Pimlico and Westminster branch, says ex-council homes on his patch are often well built, with good security and sometimes well managed. He says most lenders will offer mortgages on ex-local authority homes in central London, although some will not lend on buildings above six storeys, or of poor construction standards.


Beyond Zone 1, broadly speaking, lenders are happy with ex-council homes in desirable areas and less keen on run-down locations. Buyers must research whether there are any major repairs planned for the block or estate because they, unlike the council tenants, will have to pay a share of the cost. Request a work plan from the local council which will give a five-year list of any projects plus an estimated cost. Your solicitor should investigate any major works when conveyancing your sale.

Communal halls, lifts and walkways are often grim. Bad management, crime, drugs and gangs of teenagers making life a misery are all possibilities on a big estate. A safer bet is a small, low-rise block that’s well integrated into local streets, although this might be more expensive than average.

So before you buy, contact the tenants and residents association to discuss any major problems, knock on doors and chat with residents, talk to the local paper, study police crime statistics and visit the flat during the day and at night.



Making a rented space your home is a very tricky task especially as it isn’t your actual home, it’s someone else’s and your just renting it. But never fear Property Property Property is here with some tips and tricks on how you can convert your rented space from being just a rented space to your home.

Seek Permission from Landlord

First of all, make sure you have the permission of your Landlord. If you’re fortunate to have a flexible Landlord who doesn’t mind you suggesting and getting some paintwork and upscaling done on the space, then take advantage of that! However, if you’re Landlord is stricter and doesn’t allow permanent changes (even though painting isn’t permanent), still seek their permission for any changes you may be making to their property.

Now let’s begin….

1. Walls

A majority of the time we want to change and customise our walls, because of walls. So we recommend that your use removable wallpapers that reflect your personality in your rented space, as this will bring to life your character and make you feel homier. Also consider doing a faux wall DIY project, an amazing alternative.

2. Sticking stuff

If you’re into gallery walls or just having paintings/quotes stuck up on your wall for inspiration but your Landlord doesn’t want you nailing stuff on his walls, then we’ve got your back! Consider getting some double-sided tape, blu tack or specific customised adhesive tapes as this will ensure that you can get your gallery wall, without the expensive of drilled walls and an angry Landlord.

3. Flexible furniture

This is one of the most important things you can do! Get flexible furniture as you could easily move it around. If you’re tired of the way your space is set up, with flexible modular furniture you can just opt and switch up the structure and layout of your room at any time.

4. Decorate, Decorate, Decorate

Property Property Property advice you’re to Decorate Decorate Decorate! Adding textiles that interest you or changing the lighting accessories; anything that wouldn’t make permanent changes to your rented space but reflects your personality, you need it!


Also if you have any tips that you could recommend to us, share them in the comments and we’ll be highlighting them in our upcoming articles in the ‘Home Improvement’ series.



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As a first-time buyer, the responsibility can be quite daunting when moving yourself and your belongings into your new haven. Fortunately, for you, the buying process is made easier if you used the more traditional method, via Estate Agents. However, as soon as the keys are in your hands, the responsibility is yours!

So we’ve curated and listed below, our top 7 tips that we believe you should be doing prior to moving into your first home:

TIP #1: Change your address

There is nothing more annoying than having your utility bills, doctors’ appointments and random promotional letters being sent to your old address. Not only is it annoying for you to go back and forth to collect post or have your previous neighbours (family) have to update you on your letters that are flooding in, but it also means that your life is still registered at your old address.

So make sure you’ve updated your Driver’s License, Doctors, Water/Gas Providers or whoever it is that you’ve moved. I can tell you from experience it definitely saves you a LOT of hassle!

TIP #2: Change the locks

Now that the victory key has been placed in your palms, it’s time to throw it away and get a new one. No seriously get a new one!

Estate Agents, tradesmen, previous owners, neighbours, cats and dogs, whoever who may have had access to the house prior to you owning it will probably still have a spare key to your new home lying around. So for your sake and the sake of your sanity; have the absolute reassurance that no-one but you can get into your new home, look into getting new locks installed ASAP.

TIP #3: Spring clean the place

Whether you bought the property in Spring or not, give the place a good scrub. You might be lucky and have the previous homeowners clean up the place for you, but it’s still best to add your touch to the cleaning as you can definitely be certain that your new home is nice and clean, ready for you to decorate.

TIP #4: Don’t throw it away, paint it

If you happen to have a surprise chest of draws left in the masters’ bedroom and you don’t know what to do with it, definitely don’t throw it away!

You may not be excited about the colour or hardware of the leftover furniture, but upscaling and adding your own style to it can definitely reinforce that rewarding feeling of owning something as well as saving you money, but you can also brag to your friends about your handy work. So don’t throw it. Paint it. Style it. Repurpose it.

TIP #5: Get familiar with the community

Now, I’m not saying that you have to attend community meetings 6 weeks consecutively prior to your move or sign up to all the local clubs so that you can become familiar with everyone in the area and have Julie who lives across the road fill you in on the community gossip. I mean if you want to do that you can, and I’m sure Julie wouldn’t mind filling you in.

But rather, we suggest that you acquaint yourself with the local transportation, get a clearer understanding of the local shopping/market on offer and familiarise yourself with the key hotspots/locations around the town. It will save you a lot of mindless confusion and time. So you don’t necessarily have to research the communities’ historical records or look for a Julie.

TIP #6: Check the hardware around the house and mechanical equipment is serviced

Even though some Estate Agents offer those additional services and can recommend to you servicemen/traders to do the job before your move, it’s even more beneficial if you keep on top with the condition of the gas cooker or that the heating and cooling system are still running nicely and have had a good clean.

TIP #7: Throw a party!

Even though this tip applies more when your home has properly been furnished, it is one of our top recommendations.

Invite some friends over for a meal or a drink, not necessarily a party as you might have that one friend who after one or two drinks may decide to wreak havoc among your nicely decorated china display. A get-together is a good way to celebrate your achievement and also make your home homier.

So these are the main things we would recommend you budding first-time buyers consider doing when moving into your new place. Also, an additional checklist would come in handy (that’s a bonus tip), we’ll be providing you with one of your own checklists in the coming weeks!


Also if you have any tips that you could recommend to us, share them in the comments and we’ll be highlighting them in our upcoming articles in the ‘First Time Buyers’ series.

[Opening image sourced from Martin&Co Chelsea listing, check out the property now]

Chocolate Week: Why London is the Sweetest Place to Live

This week (October 8th-14th), it’s Chocolate Week; the UK’s biggest celebration of the sweet stuff, and an easy excuse for us to dive in to the lovely stuff. As well as being a nationwide celebration of the dark stuff (or white stuff, if that’s your thing) in homes and offices, you can bet there will lots to do in London including a choc-opera in Belgravia and tasting events in Piccadilly Circus.

That’s one of the great things about living in London; there is just so much to do. You’re only a tube ride away from some sort of event tied to national or international celebrations. As a resident, you can never have an excuse to not have anything to do; a quick skim of the weekend paper, search online or even wander around will bring you into contact with something fun and interesting to pass the time.Often you won’t even need to plan ahead or even actively look for things to pass the time, as you’re hit with options every time you go out through sings, billboards, posters etc. Some are more traditional or historical, whereas as others might be a bit more quirkier or “on-the-edge”.

Returning to chocolate, London has a great place in the history of the delicacy coming to these shores in the 17th century. It was in 1657 that the first chocolate house was opened in Bishopsgate by order of Charles II and it was Christopher Columbus who brought it over from his travels.

Even when it’s not Chocolate Week, you’ll be hard-pressed not to get your chocolate fix when in London. As well as the multitude of shops, both big and small you can find special chocolate tours which run regularly all year round, in the Mayfair and Chelsea areas. To cater to international residents and tourists who might be a bit homesick, you’ll also come across shops which import products from all around the world.

Some people complain about the average rent in London being more than anywhere else in the country (not that this is any different from most other countries and their largest cities). However, it’s times like these, in terms of options of entertainment and culture, when the benefits of living in a cosmopolitan city really reveal themselves.